Friday, 12 June 2015

'More Harm Than Good: Confronting the Psychiatric Medication Epidemic' Conference 18 September 2015 London

London 18 Sep: “More Harm than Good: Confronting the Psychiatric Medication Epidemic on CEP UK 

"The Council for Evidence-based Psychiatry invites you to join global leaders in the critical psychiatry movement for a one-day conference which will address an urgent public health issue: the iatrogenic harm caused by the over-prescription of psychiatric medications.
University of Roehampton

There is clear evidence that these drugs cause more harm than good over the long term, and can damage patients and even shorten their lives. Yet why are these medications so popular? What harms are they causing? What can be done to address the problem?

This event brings together key experts from both sides of the Atlantic to debate these issues, and we invite you to join the discussion.

Speakers and panellists include: Dr Peter Breggin, Robert Whitaker, Prof Peter Gøtzsche, Dr Joanna Moncrieff, Prof Peter Kinderman, Prof John Abraham and Dr James Davies.

For the programme and detailed information please go to http://cepuk.org/moreharmthangood.

Cost: £85 for delegates, £28 for students, patients / service users and their families (includes lunch)

Location: Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, London SW15 5PU

£70 early bird rate for delegates until 30 June!"

To book your place please follow this link: http://estore.roehampton.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&catid=172&prodid=217


Conference Programme 18 September 2015 London
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Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime website:

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And here is the Denmark Conference Programme, 16 September 2015:

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Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime: This is the homepage of Professor Peter C 
Gøtzsche, Director of The Nordic Cochrane Centre.  Contact information: www.cochrane.dk.

Peter graduated as a master of science in biology and chemistry in 1974 and as a physician 1984. He is a specialist in internal medicine; worked with clinical trials and regulatory affairs in the drug industry 1975-1983, and at hospitals in Copenhagen 1984-95. He co-founded The Cochrane Collaboration in 1993 and established The Nordic Cochrane Centre the same year. He became professor of Clinical Research Design and Analysis in 2010 at the University of Copenhagen.

Peter has published more than 70 papers in “the big five” (BMJ, Lancet, JAMA, Ann Intern Med and N Engl J Med) and his scientific works have been cited more than 15,000 times. He is author of “Rational Diagnosis and Treatment.  Evidence-Based Clinical Decision-Making” (2007), “Mammography Screening: truth, lies and controversy” (2012), and “Deadly medicines and organised crime: How big pharma has corrupted health care” (2013).

Peter has an interest in statistics and research methodology. He is a member of several groups publishing guidelines for good reporting of research and has co-authored CONSORT for randomised trials (www.consort-statement.org), STROBE for observational studies (www.strobe-statement.org), PRISMA for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (www.prisma-statement.org) and SPIRIT for trial protocols (www.spirit-statement.org). Peter was an editor in the Cochrane Methodology Review Group 1997-2014.

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My comment: I've booked a place and bought the plane tickets.  I support the statement that the use of psychiatric drugs in the longer term can do more harm than good.  That there is an epidemic of psychiatric drug prescribing, polypharmacy, drug cocktails.  In my experience it has got worse over the decades since I was first a mental patient in 1978.

I am critical of there being no women speaking at the 18 September London CEPUK conference although Dr Joanna Moncrieff is on the panel.  I would like to see more equality in events like this in terms of women's voices, on the platform, side by side with the men.  Not just emoting and testifying to psychiatric abuse although I believe this has merit.  

I've often shared my story at events and meetings.  Spilling my guts I sometimes call it.  Because it's painful to do.  And costly in terms of energy and emotion.  Far easier to teach or lecture, get paid a decent amount and not feel like a performing monkey, getting paid peanuts.


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